About Silicon Run Productions

Silicon Run has been producing award winning educational films about semiconductor and computer manufacturing since 1986, with its two most recent films exploring the exciting fields of Nanotechnology and MEMS (microelectromechanical systems). Each film features live industrial footage and illustrates technical processes using vivid animations and graphics. All Silicon Run titles are available on DVD and by streaming. »read more

Our Films

Silicon Run’s nine award winning educational films explore the fascinating process of semiconductor manufacturing from A to Z. Shot on site and illustrated with rich animations, Silicon Run’s films provide in-depth studies of such topics as: MEMS (microelectromechanical systems), Nanotechnology, Lithography, Implantation, Deposition, Etch, front end and back end semiconductor manufacturing (Silicon Run I and II) and Silicon Run LITE (an overview film useful as an intro).

I highly recommend that Silicon Run II along with Silicon Run I be used in any introductory curriculum pertaining to the integrated circuit. The films also show the many technical positions open in the industry and emphasize the skills needed to qualify for them. They are great recruiting tools for our department! Bruce Bothwell
Chemeketa Community College
Professors at the University of Arizona will show several of the Silicon Run films during a course on Microelectronics Manufacturing and the Environment. The series offers students an excellent overview of semi-conductor manufacturing processes with informative video shots.Sally Clement
Education Coordinator NSF/SRC ERC for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing
University of Arizona
I have found films like Silicon Run’s very valuable to physics students. Physics students spend most of their time in classrooms so their exposure to physics is entirely theoretical. They know these theoretical principles play an important role in modern technology; however, they have little idea how physics is implemented at the product level. Invariably, they find the fabrication of the computer chip very fascinating.Peter Y. Yu
University of California
Berkeley